How did teaching test automation work out?

A while ago I wrote a post about a set of workshops I was asked to setup for functional testers, test coordinators and test managers to get the familiar and acquainted with testautomation and performance testing. I pre-selected a set of tools which I wanted to go through with the participants. The slides I used for this can be found on SlideShare:


Apologies for the slides being in Dutch. Possibly I will come up with the EN version as well, however the training was in Dutch.

This part of the evening already created a lot of discussion and questions. One of the nicest questions was the obvious one: “is coding really needed when working on test automation? I thought test automation tools and software were advanced enough nowadays to no longer require code to work well?” This questions fairly obvious, considering the tools I selected for the training, Sikuli and AutoIt SciTE. Both tools require a lot of coding in order for them to be at all usable.

The hands-on experiences

After we had had the theoretical bits we moved on to the hands on bit. As visible on the last slide there were a few (simple) assignments prepared for the participants. The first one was executing a calculation with the Microsoft built-in calculator. Fairly straight forward and rudimentary I thought. A few had prior coding knowledge so they went to do this exercise with AutoIt rather than with Sikuli, the majority of the group however attempted to execute this task with Sikuli.

Sikuli

Since Sikuli is mainly image based almost everyone started by actually clicking on the START button and going through the Windows Start Menu. After a while I thought it worth while to show the group how to just launch an application from within Sikuli through the RUN command of Windows. This of course immediately raised the question why I would prefer to do that over manipulating the mouse (which is answered simply by explaining the concept of cross-platform (or at least cross windows version) testing with test automation, the <WIN>+R key-combo has been in existence since Windows 95 if I recall correctly and thus this is backwards compatible and since you can still use this within Windows 8.1 it is also forwards compatible).

Sikuli turned out to be a hit with the participants. They barely noticed they were actually writing code and at some point I saw a fairly experienced test-manager explain some basic things of Python coding to at least two other test-managers. Non of these had prior coding experiences, not even the one explaining things.

AutoIt

AutoIt, with full access and use of the Windows API however was a bit more of a stretch. Turns out the Basic based language for AutoIt is for non-coding testers a lot more difficult to understand than Python. The first assignment, manipulating the Windows Calculator, was for most still doable, although it took a lot more explaining and showing than Sikuli.

The second assignment, calculating the square root of a number in Excel proved for most really difficult. I had hoped they would see the use of the Windows API and thus also come up with using the Office API in doing this, but apparently I overestimated the ease of use of AutoIt for them.

My takeaways

Next time I do an evening like this I now know to introduce AutoIt separately, after people have gained some experience with Sikuli. Guiding them a bit more with the AutoIt things, instead of letting them go.
Overall the test automation evening was really great and I do believe everyone had great fun and actually got a bit of an idea of what it is that attracts me to testautomation.

2 thoughts on “How did teaching test automation work out?

  1. Pingback: Testing Bits – 12/29/13 – 1/4/14 | Testing Curator Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s